Upholstery and Staples

upholstery - after

Boat upholstery takes a real hammering. Constantly exposed to salt, damp air, damp salty people and our case damp salty dog.

Jessica’s cabin upholstery was actually in quite good condition but it was tired and dated. So I thought I would take on a task on monumental proportions and tackle the upholstery myself.

Staples and more staples.

Resourcing the material and replacement foam on eBay was simple.  I begin with the 2 beds/cots. Easy peasy as the mattresses are rectangular in shape with no piping.

Cot Upholstery
Cot Upholstery

Feeling very pleased with myself I turn to the cabins V berth. This consists of 3 squabs, 3 back panels and a table infill. My idea is to deconstruct each piece and make patterns for the new material. Easier said than done.  I have never seen so many wretched stables. It takes me 5 hours to take apart just one backboard but I am rewarded with perfect patterns  a few blisters and a couple of missing finger nails.

old upholstery
old upholstery

My next headache is make sure that the stripes all run the same way. Why did I not choose plain material and make my life easier?

Nearly There
Nearly There

Piping is a complete mystery to me but I have managed to sew it on in all the right places. Now came the really tricky bit, getting the contours on the seats and backs right. This requires about 8 pairs of hands and a load more of the damn staples. After stuffing the squabs with foam the fruits of of my labour are finally coming to light.
The hard wood trims were easy in comparison, I just set to with a hot glue gun. Finally the whole ensemble was sprayed to an inch of its life with waterproof fabric protector, red wine can be a killer to upholstery.
Would I do it again? Watch this space.